Jonisey

stopwhitepeopleforever:

animegeek1130:

stopwhitepeopleforever:

iloveitwhenyoucallmebigappa:

thedeviousplot:

leunq:

wtf

wtf

get the fuck out

I want Plankton to plow my ass into the 4th dimension, I want my ass to be the reason he doesn’t give up when he fails to steal the krabby patty formula, I want you to send me to bikini bottom with 40 tanks of oxygen cause I’m gonna be on that dick for 40 days and 40 nights and then some I don’t give a fuck I’ll die riding that dick

please calm down ma’m

I’m a guy

canhug:

BOBRACHA 4 LYFE!
visit The Oatmeal at #SDCC booth 1021 
( fanplush by http://cornstarch.etsy.com )

canhug:

BOBRACHA 4 LYFE!

visit The Oatmeal at #SDCC booth 1021 

( fanplush by http://cornstarch.etsy.com )

kimononagoya:

Mod 2:  Kimono print dresses by Lolita Brand Metamorphose.  I like these better than the typical “Wa-Loli” style you see wher ethe top half if a Kimono and the bottom is a puffy skirt.  On one hand that makes sense… picking out the iconic portions of the distinct silhouette of the styles.  Unfortunatly I find that mashing the silhouettes of block-shape Kimono into fit-and-flare Loli doesn’t seem to work.  (I’m sure there must be a way that makes it work, I just haven’t seen it, personally) 
That said incorporating Yukata cotton into another shape (as above) really doesn’t  do too much differently than any other cotton and you’re left with an overwheling sense of Lolita done with Japanese cotton. Which is nice enough.  The added touch of the above examples are uses of the more traditional colour palette in Kimono. 
What I would like to see is more incorporation of Motif/textures/textiles and colour-play into the garments as focal/detail pieces like in some of the Kaga Yuuzen-Lolita fashion show.  (That beige jacket, guys!)I think that’s what the whole Wa-loli movement is needing, not just more cotton prints. 

kimononagoya:

Mod 2:  Kimono print dresses by Lolita Brand Metamorphose.  I like these better than the typical “Wa-Loli” style you see wher ethe top half if a Kimono and the bottom is a puffy skirt.  On one hand that makes sense… picking out the iconic portions of the distinct silhouette of the styles.  Unfortunatly I find that mashing the silhouettes of block-shape Kimono into fit-and-flare Loli doesn’t seem to work.  (I’m sure there must be a way that makes it work, I just haven’t seen it, personally) 

That said incorporating Yukata cotton into another shape (as above) really doesn’t  do too much differently than any other cotton and you’re left with an overwheling sense of Lolita done with Japanese cotton. Which is nice enough.  The added touch of the above examples are uses of the more traditional colour palette in Kimono. 

What I would like to see is more incorporation of Motif/textures/textiles and colour-play into the garments as focal/detail pieces like in some of the Kaga Yuuzen-Lolita fashion show.  (That beige jacket, guys!)

I think that’s what the whole Wa-loli movement is needing, not just more cotton prints. 

kimononagoya:

This same obi from several days ago is now paired with blue, red and yellow instead of pink and green—and once again it’s punching through the chaos of the traditional design to bring it right up to modern.
The kimono itself is utilizing a classic, almost childish sky  blue with warm red and lemon yellow flowers—this color set is often seen in 7-5-3 Festival childrens’ kimono. But here the fuchsia obi is bringing lime green out of the kimono and into focus as well as acting as an anchor for all that light blue. I love how the circles of the obi are about the same size as the flowers on the furisode itself: this also helps to unify the outfit.

kimononagoya:

This same obi from several days ago is now paired with blue, red and yellow instead of pink and green—and once again it’s punching through the chaos of the traditional design to bring it right up to modern.

The kimono itself is utilizing a classic, almost childish sky  blue with warm red and lemon yellow flowers—this color set is often seen in 7-5-3 Festival childrens’ kimono. But here the fuchsia obi is bringing lime green out of the kimono and into focus as well as acting as an anchor for all that light blue. I love how the circles of the obi are about the same size as the flowers on the furisode itself: this also helps to unify the outfit.

kimononagoya:

You may recognize some of these kimono as being Mamechiyo’s and you’d be correct!You can see a nice use of wigs, extensions and hats/hair pieces to play up a cohesive ‘look’ of the outfits. These play with the idea of high fashion and haute couture, even going as far as a Marie-Antoinette look.Personally (Mod 2) I’m really loving the pale ‘blondes’  in yellow and green with touches of pink.  Choosing a kimono based on your skin-tone and hair can go a long way in giving an outfit some extra umph!
Various Credits: Amber van Lier, Yeliz Kaya, Mame Chiyo, Angela Heerms, Dorith Graef,Nahanni Make Up Artist and Naomi Make Up Artist.

kimononagoya:

You may recognize some of these kimono as being Mamechiyo’s and you’d be correct!
You can see a nice use of wigs, extensions and hats/hair pieces to play up a cohesive ‘look’ of the outfits. These play with the idea of high fashion and haute couture, even going as far as a Marie-Antoinette look.
Personally (Mod 2) I’m really loving the pale ‘blondes’  in yellow and green with touches of pink.  Choosing a kimono based on your skin-tone and hair can go a long way in giving an outfit some extra umph!

Various Credits: Amber van LierYeliz KayaMame ChiyoAngela HeermsDorith Graef,Nahanni Make Up Artist and Naomi Make Up Artist.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Hinke Schreuders

Works on paper

2013 & 2014

clouetvis:

all of the lights 1 by *Shaiel* on Flickr.

pencilkitty:

Beautiful pixel fanart by http://dav-19.deviantart.com/